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Films Showing

August 14

Wanda

Wanda

12:00pm2:00pm
DIRECTOR: BARBARA LODEN
1970 / 102min / DCP
Wanda, the film’s heroine, is a woman who Loden once described as living “an ugly type existence,” as a wife and mother who abandons her family (and herself too), in pursuit of what exactly? Some sense of self.
The Last Movie

The Last Movie

DIRECTOR: DENNIS HOPPER
1971 / 108min / DCP
A stuntman is working on the set of a western shooting in backwater Peru, where the local peasants begin to absorb the action of the shoot into their ritual and folklore, and cinema melts into life itself.
The 317th Platoon

The 317th Platoon

1:00pm3:15pm6:30pm
DIRECTOR: PIERRE SCHOENDOERFFER
1965 / 100min / DCP
Before there was a Vietnam War and an accompanying cinema to describe it, there was the Indochina War and a sucking quagmire for the French army that predicted what was to come for the Americans. Pierre Schoendoerffer, a onetime army cameraman and veteran, depicts all the grit and sweat and fear of tropical combat in this too-little-seen frontlines classic, embedded with a French platoon pinned down behind enemy lines and fighting for their lives.
Your Name

Your Name

DIRECTOR: MAKOTO SHINKAI
2016 / 106min / DCP
The highest-grossing anime release of all time, Shinkai’s Your Name follows a romance beset by complications quite unlike any you’ve seen before in a movie. One day high schoolers Mitsuha, a girl, and Taki, a boy, suddenly and inexplicably find themselves switching bodies. As if this weren’t enough of a problem, a tenderness begins to grow between them through the notes and memos that they exchange in anticipation of the next swap—and all this before the comet strike, the first of many plot wrinkles in time. A modern classic, moving and melancholy yet never saccharine, bolstered by peerless character animation and RADWIMPS’ insert songs.

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Wanda

Wanda

DIRECTOR: BARBARA LODEN
1970 / 102min / DCP
Wanda, the film’s heroine, is a woman who Loden once described as living “an ugly type existence,” as a wife and mother who abandons her family (and herself too), in pursuit of what exactly? Some sense of self.
The 317th Platoon

The 317th Platoon

DIRECTOR: PIERRE SCHOENDOERFFER
1965 / 100min / DCP
Before there was a Vietnam War and an accompanying cinema to describe it, there was the Indochina War and a sucking quagmire for the French army that predicted what was to come for the Americans. Pierre Schoendoerffer, a onetime army cameraman and veteran, depicts all the grit and sweat and fear of tropical combat in this too-little-seen frontlines classic, embedded with a French platoon pinned down behind enemy lines and fighting for their lives.
The Last Movie

The Last Movie

DIRECTOR: DENNIS HOPPER
1971 / 108min / DCP
A stuntman is working on the set of a western shooting in backwater Peru, where the local peasants begin to absorb the action of the shoot into their ritual and folklore, and cinema melts into life itself.
Your Name

Your Name

DIRECTOR: MAKOTO SHINKAI
2016 / 106min / DCP
The highest-grossing anime release of all time, Shinkai’s Your Name follows a romance beset by complications quite unlike any you’ve seen before in a movie. One day high schoolers Mitsuha, a girl, and Taki, a boy, suddenly and inexplicably find themselves switching bodies. As if this weren’t enough of a problem, a tenderness begins to grow between them through the notes and memos that they exchange in anticipation of the next swap—and all this before the comet strike, the first of many plot wrinkles in time. A modern classic, moving and melancholy yet never saccharine, bolstered by peerless character animation and RADWIMPS’ insert songs.
The Wild Child

The Wild Child

DIRECTOR: FRANçOIS TRUFFAUT
1970 / 83min / 35mm
The real-life case of “Victor of Aveyron,” a child grown to the verge of adolescence without human contact, discovered in a forest in the south of France at the end of the 18th century, became the basis for this touching and turbulent meditation on education and acculturation. Truffaut stars as Victor’s mentor, Dr. Itard, and records the boy’s socialization in documentary detail, while cinematographer Nestor Almendros, shooting in high-contrast black-and-white in the 1.33:1 Academy ratio and making ample use of irises, evokes the look and texture of early cinema. Truffaut, who always displayed a flair for a final scene, here concludes with one of his most quietly devastating endings.
Small Change

Small Change

DIRECTOR: FRANçOIS TRUFFAUT
1976 / 104min / 35mm
From first kisses to more sinister secrets, all of the loneliness and sweetness and danger and astonishing endurance of childhood is contained here, in Truffaut’s string of vignettes concerning a group of schoolchildren in central France and their very involved, concerned instructor (Jean-François Stévenin).
Mississippi Mermaid

Mississippi Mermaid

DIRECTOR: FRANçOIS TRUFFAUT
1969 / 123min / 35mm
Adapted, like The Bride Wore Black, from a crime novel by “William Irish” (a pseudonym of Cornell Woolrich), Mississippi Mermaid’s location-hopping tale of catastrophic amour fou begins on the Island of Réunion, where Jean-Paul Belmondo awaits the arrival of a mail order bride who might not be what she seems—though he doesn’t ask too many questions, since she’s Catherine Deneuve.
PRIVATE EVENT TODAY IN THEATER & COMMISSARY

PRIVATE EVENT TODAY IN THEATER & COMMISSARY

- / 360min / 35mm
We'll see you tomorrow!
Minding the Gap

Minding the Gap

DIRECTOR: BING LIU
2018 / 93min / DCP
Minding the Gap boldly collides 12 years of fast-paced, gravity-defying cinematography with intimate, patient verite from the deceivingly quotidian lives of three young skateboarders in Rockford, Illinois—23-year old new father, Zack; jobless teenager Keire; and Bing Liu, the film’s director. As each subject strives to become a better man over the years, they must overcome the realities of race, class, abuse, and relationships with mothers in their lives.
The Story of Adele H.

The Story of Adele H.

DIRECTOR: FRANçOIS TRUFFAUT
1975 / 96min / 35mm
Self-destructive lovelorn obsession, one of Truffaut’s abiding themes, received its most anguished, full-throttle treatment by him in this passionate and immediate 1860s-set period piece, which draws on the diaries of Adèle Hugo, daughter of the famous novelist Victor. The part of Adèle, chasing after Bruce Robinson’s military officer from Guernsey to Halifax to Barbados while refusing to acknowledge his indifference, gives Isabelle Adjani one of the roles of a lifetime, a fervid fanatic of love undone by belief in the cult of Romanticism that her father had helped to create.
5 Centimeters Per Second

5 Centimeters Per Second

DIRECTOR: MAKOTO SHINKAI
2007 / 63min / DCP
Named Best Animated Feature at the 2007 Asia Pacific Screen Awards, Shinkai’s three-part romantic drama follows protagonist Takaki Tōno from elementary school to adulthood, from the early 1990s to 2008, tracking his relationship with classmate Akari from pre-pubescent friendship to a mutual later-in-life regret of an unfulfilled romance that remains just out of reach. A film rich with longing and wistful regret playing out beneath a watercolor sky, its animation a marvel of sensitive, filigreed detail.
Children Who Chase Lost Voices

Children Who Chase Lost Voices

DIRECTOR: MAKOTO SHINKAI
2011 / 116min / DCP
Asuna, an unsupervised, independent girl, escapes her lonely life by listening to mysterious music on the crystal radio left to her by her late father, only to one day find more escape than she’d bargained for in a passage to Agartha, a fabled underground land of the dead populated by shadow-dwelling monsters, Quetzalcoatls, and other unbelievable creatures. A robust adventure story and, at heart, a wrenching meditation on the process of mourning, saying goodbye, and moving on.
The Tale of the Princess Kaguya

The Tale of the Princess Kaguya

DIRECTOR: ISAO TAKAHATA
2013 / 137min / DCP
A richly realized fable that begins when a bamboo cutter discovers a tiny girl inside of one of the shoots that he’s chopping, and decides to raise her as a princess—a decision that has very little to do with her down-to-earth nature. The final film by Studio Ghibli’s recently-passed co-founder, Takahata, and among his greatest achievements, with every frame a marvel of storytelling concision and handcrafted care.
The Bride Wore Black

The Bride Wore Black

DIRECTOR: FRANçOIS TRUFFAUT
1968 / 107min / 35mm
Heavily inspired by Truffaut’s long engagement with the films of Alfred Hitchcock, The Bride Wore Black is both a subtle tribute and an explosion of Hitch’s themes and styles; the score by Bernard Herrmann is essentially on steriods. Truffaut approached this ruthless, stylish film as a series of suspense set pieces, casting Jeanne Moreau as the eponymous bride, widowed on the day of her nuptials, who has since set out to locate every one of the men involved in her husband’s assassination, and to exact her merciless revenge.
The Man Who Loved Women

The Man Who Loved Women

DIRECTOR: FRANçOIS TRUFFAUT
1977 / 120min / 35mm
Framed by a funeral, this isn’t your average French sex farce, but rather a plaintive and sometimes pathetic comedy of compulsive Don Juanism, with Charles Denner as an aerodynamics engineer who spends his every waking moment (and the full measure of his scheming ingenuity) in pursuit of the fairer sex.
The Green Room

The Green Room

DIRECTOR: FRANçOIS TRUFFAUT
1978 / 94min / 35mm
One of Truffaut’s most personal and beautiful films, photographed by Néstor Almendros, and one of the least known of his major works—audiences weren’t ready for this stark rumination on death from a filmmaker known for his gentle humor and enchanting personability. Not far removed from his own premature end, Truffaut stars himself alongside Nathalie Baye in this adaptation of Henry James’s short story “Altar of the Dead,” about a newspaper obituary writer who has become obsessed with the memory of friends departed from this mortal coil—represented here by images of the director’s own deceased loved ones.
The Place Promised in Our Early Days

The Place Promised in Our Early Days

DIRECTOR: MAKOTO SHINKAI & YOSHIO SUZUKI
2004 / 91min / DCP
Shinkai’s feature debut, featuring a delicate score by repeat collaborator Tenmon, revolves around friendships on the verge of dissolution and a world hanging on the brink of war, imagining an alternate timeline Japan where half of the country has been occupied since 1974 by the Soviet Union. Boyhood friends Hiroki and Takuya drift apart in later life, but remain united in their shared grief at the disappearance of their friend, Sayuri, even as their youthful dreams are ground under the gears of approaching tank convoys.
The Night is Short, Walk on Girl

The Night is Short, Walk on Girl

DIRECTOR: MASAAKI YUASA
2017 / 93min / DCP
A surreal nocturnal animated odyssey from the mad genius behind Mind Game, rendered in a frenetic, galaxy-brained, endlessly morphing style, Night is Short, Walk on Girl follows a mysterious high schooler known only as the Girl with Black Hair through the streets of Kyoto’s famed Ponto-Cho party district, drinking middle-aged salarymen under the table between mixing with barflies, obsessive collectors, and guerilla theater performers, all the while oblivious to the efforts of a fellow student who has been creating increasingly fantastic and contrived reasons to run into her in a gambit to win her love.
Maison du Bonheur

Maison du Bonheur

DIRECTOR: SOFIA BOHDANOWICZ
2017 / 62min / DCP
For half a century, 77-year-old Juliane Sellam, raconteur, accomplished astrologist, and solemn maintainer of refined rituals, has lived in the same home in Montmartre, Paris. Sofia Bohdanowicz, one of the most distinctive voices in Canadian independent cinema, delves into Sellam’s sanctum to record the older woman’s vast store of tales and household routines, in the process finding herself taking a sort of direction from her subject, even having her astrological chart read.
On the Town

On the Town

DIRECTOR: STANLEY DONEN AND GENE KELLY
1949 / 98min / 35mm
Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra, and Jules Munshin are three sailors with twenty-four hours of shore leave in Manhattan; Vera-Ellen, Betty Garrett, and Ann Miller are the footloose gals helping them make the most of it; and a show-stopping songbook, including Leonard Bernstein’s “New York, New York,” does the rest of the work in this almost criminally enjoyable romp.
My Little Chickadee

My Little Chickadee

DIRECTOR: EDWARD F. CLINE
1940 / 83min / 35mm
Rightly suspected of illicit relations with the Masked Bandit, Flower Belle Lee is run out of Little Bend. On the train she meets con man Cuthbert J. Twillie and pretends to marry him for "respectability." Arrived in Greasewood City with his unkissed bride, Twillie is named sheriff by town boss Jeff Badger...with an ulterior motive. Meanwhile, both stars inimitably display their specialties, as Twillie tends bar and plays cards, and Flower Belle tames the town's rowdy schoolboys...