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Films Showing

April 26

Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami

Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami

DIRECTOR: SOPHIE FIENNES
2017 / 115min / DCP
A documentary portrait of the powerful and pansexual glam-pop diva, observed in close quarters over the course of several years, the all-access segments of her quotidian existence on the road punctuated by larger-than-larger-than-life musical numbers.
The Devil and Father Amorth

The Devil and Father Amorth

DIRECTOR: WILLIAM FRIEDKIN
2017 / 68min / DCP
Friedkin, a legendary raconteur, leads a tour that moves from the infamous Exorcist steps in Georgetown to Italy, where he meets with the 91-year-old Father Gabriele Amorth, official exorcist of the Diocese of Rome, and accompanies Amorth on one of his terrifying house calls.
The Exorcist

The Exorcist

DIRECTOR: WILLIAM FRIEDKIN
1973 / 122min / DCP
When it rst appeared in cinemas Friedkin’s profane, blasphemous, frequently-brutal adaptation of William Peter Blatty’s best-selling supernatural thriller was experienced as a startling, almost-unprecedented cinematic assault, the harsh, harrowing work of a master filmmaker.

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Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami

Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami

DIRECTOR: SOPHIE FIENNES
2017 / 115min / DCP
A documentary portrait of the powerful and pansexual glam-pop diva, observed in close quarters over the course of several years, the all-access segments of her quotidian existence on the road punctuated by larger-than-larger-than-life musical numbers.
The Devil and Father Amorth

The Devil and Father Amorth

DIRECTOR: WILLIAM FRIEDKIN
2017 / 68min / DCP
Friedkin, a legendary raconteur, leads a tour that moves from the infamous Exorcist steps in Georgetown to Italy, where he meets with the 91-year-old Father Gabriele Amorth, official exorcist of the Diocese of Rome, and accompanies Amorth on one of his terrifying house calls.
The Exorcist

The Exorcist

DIRECTOR: WILLIAM FRIEDKIN
1973 / 122min / DCP
When it rst appeared in cinemas Friedkin’s profane, blasphemous, frequently-brutal adaptation of William Peter Blatty’s best-selling supernatural thriller was experienced as a startling, almost-unprecedented cinematic assault, the harsh, harrowing work of a master filmmaker.
To Live and Die in L.A.

To Live and Die in L.A.

DIRECTOR: WILLIAM FRIEDKIN
1985 / 116min / DCP
Adrenaline-junkie Secret Service agent William Petersen and partner John Pankow are looking to bring down Willem Dafoe’s funny money-making gallery sophisticate, even if it means driving full speed into oncoming traffic to do it.
Sorcerer

Sorcerer

DIRECTOR: WILLIAM FRIEDKIN
1977 / 121min / DCP
Brooklyn crook Roy Scheider splits town and winds up in the sweaty armpit of South America, taking on a suicide mission to transport volatile nitroglycerine across a rugged, pitiless jungle with fellow hard-up hard cases Bruno Cremer and Francisco Rabal.
Mrs. Hyde

Mrs. Hyde

DIRECTOR: SERGE BOZON
2017 / 95min / DCP
The grand dame of the international art cinema, Isabelle Huppert, plays a double role in Bozon’s rich, strange comic thriller, a very free reworking of Robert Louis Stevenson set in the Paris suburbs.
Point of Order!

Point of Order!

DIRECTOR: EMILE DE ANTONIO
1964 / 97min / 35mm
De Antonio distilled down this taut true-life political-moral thriller, which following an opening narration by the director puts aside voiceover completely, allowing the historical record to speak clearly and convincingly for itself.
Underground

Underground

DIRECTOR: EMILE DE ANTONIO, MARY LAMPSON & HASKELL WEXLER
1976 / 87min / 16mm
At the heart of Underground are de Antonio, Lampson, and Wexler’s clandestine interviews with on-the-lam militant “Weatherpeople” Bill Ayers, Kathy Boudin, and Bernadine Dohrn—the very existence of which were enough to get the lmmakers subpoenaed by the FBI.
America is Hard to See

America is Hard to See

DIRECTOR: EMILE DE ANTONIO
1970 / 90min / 16mm
Offering an embedded perspective from inside cerebral Minnesota Congressman Eugene McCarthy’s campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination, de Antonio observes the last stand of peace politics and moral sanity on the national American political field.
King Kong vs. Godzilla

King Kong vs. Godzilla

DIRECTOR: ISHIRô HONDA
1962 / 91min / 35mm
The biggest Japanese-American battle royale since WWII, shot in color TohoScope splendor-a first in the Godzilla franchise-by the master of the kaiju movie!
Rush to Judgment with Executive Action

Rush to Judgment with Executive Action

DIRECTOR: EMILE DE ANTONIO
1967 / 189min / 35mm
An early and perhaps never exceeded entry in the eld of Warren Report-skepticist works, Rush to Judgment, made in collaboration with attorney Mark Lane, reopens the case of John Fitzgerald Kennedy’s assassination. Screening with Executive Action.
Mr. Hoover and I

Mr. Hoover and I

DIRECTOR: EMILE DE ANTONIO
1989 / 86min / 16mm
De Antonio appears directly addressing the camera in autobiographical reverie, reflecting on the events of his seventy-year life and the parallel rise of the American police and surveillance state under the guidance of J. Edgar Hoover.
Painters Painting

Painters Painting

DIRECTOR: EMILE DE ANTONIO
1973 / 116min / DCP
A series of pro les of painters and art world gures based around the Metropolitan Museum’s exhibition ‘New York Painting and Sculpture: 1940-1970,’ whose cast includes Willem de Kooning and Helen Frankenthaler.
Screening Room with Emile de Antonio

Screening Room with Emile de Antonio

DIRECTOR: ROBERT GARDNER
1973 / 79min / Digital
A televised discussion with host Robert Gardner and De Antonio, along with visual anthropologist Edmund Carpenter.
In the King of Prussia

In the King of Prussia

DIRECTOR: EMILE DE ANTONIO
1983 / 92min / 16mm
In September of 1980, a group of anti-war activists who would come to be known as the “Plowshares Eight” were charged in connection with the destruction of materials intended for nuclear warheads in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania.
Millhouse: A White Comedy with The Checkers Speech

Millhouse: A White Comedy with The Checkers Speech

DIRECTOR: EMILE DE ANTONIO
1971 / 92min / 35mm
A biopic portrait of Richard Nixon as complicated, pathos-ridden, and ultimately absurd as the man himself, de Antonio’s found-footage comedy/picaresque follows Number 37 on his rise to power.
The Intruder With Roger Corman

The Intruder With Roger Corman

DIRECTOR: ROGER CORMAN
84min / 35mm
Corman, a gifted raconteur who has seen just about everything there is to see in his life in movies, will be on hand to present two highlights of his extraordinarily prolific career, and hopefully to share a few insights into how to beat the system.
The Pit And The Pendulum With Roger Corman

The Pit And The Pendulum With Roger Corman

DIRECTOR: ROGER CORMAN
1961 / 80min / 35mm
Adaption of Edgar Allaen Poem set in 16th century Spain, where an imperious Vincent Price knows more than he lets on about the mysterious recent death of his wife.
Angels Wear White

Angels Wear White

DIRECTOR: VIVIAN QU
2017 / 107min / DCP
Two schoolgirls are assaulted in a motel; Mia, a teenager on-duty at the desk who is the lone witness, says nothing to the authorities for fear of reprisal, but she begins to buckle upon meeting one of the victims, 12-year-old Wen, and finds herself sucked into an intrigue involving media, local government, and more.
Light Sleeper

Light Sleeper

DIRECTOR: PAUL SCHRADER
1992 / 103min / 35mm
Willem Dafoe, understated and unbelievably gentle, plays John LeTour, a recovering drug addict who still deals to a high-end New York clientele maintained by boss Susan Sarandon, who’s looking to move on from the business.
Modern Times

Modern Times

DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
1936 / 87min / 35mm
Working as a factory hand, The Tramp finds himself transforming into a twitching automaton, to the alarm of superiors who begin to suspect him of radicalism, as the inspired gags keep coming down the conveyor belt.
In the Year of the Pig

In the Year of the Pig

DIRECTOR: EMILE DE ANTONIO
1968 / 103min / 35mm
De Antonio’s best-known lm is a landmark of the burgeoning artistic protest against U.S. policy in Vietnam, drawing together found-footage material to create a comprehensive primer on the region’s colonial past and its destructively militarized present.
Taxi Driver

Taxi Driver

DIRECTOR: MARTIN SCORSESE
1976 / 113min / DCP
Martin Scorsese’s jarring masterpiece of violence in New York in the seventies.
The Walker

The Walker

DIRECTOR: PAUL SCHRADER
2007 / 108min / 35mm
A droll, wry, and altogether perfect Woody Harrelson plays Carter Page III, a pure, corrupt creature of the Beltway whose impeccable manners make him an ideal paid companion to Washington D.C. socialites, the fact that he’s gay notwithstanding.
American Gigolo

American Gigolo

DIRECTOR: PAUL SCHRADER
1980 / 117min / 35mm
This is the movie where Schrader found a new alchemy of style and soul, fusing Italian design and west coast cool, queer aesthetics and religious art from the 12th century to Robert Bresson.
Ponyo

Ponyo

DIRECTOR: HAYAO MIYAZAKI
2008 / 103min / DCP
The pinks and blues pop off the screen in Hayao Miyazaki’s adorable Little Mermaid–like tale of the blossoming friendship between a boy and a goldfish who dreams of living out of the water.
Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai

Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai

DIRECTOR: JIM JARMUSCH
1999 / 116min / 35mm
Forest Whitaker’s Ghost Dog's a devoted bibliophile, following the samurai code as laid out in Yamamoto Tsunetomo’s Hagakure, and relaxes by tending to his pigeon coop, which you’d be wise not to mess with. While borrowing from Jean-Pierre Melville and spaghetti westerns, this offbeat piece of pulp art is finally pure Jarmusch.
The King And The Mockingbird

The King And The Mockingbird

DIRECTOR: PAUL GRIMAULT
1980 / 83min / DCP
Imagined as France’s first animated feature at the end of the 1940s by Grimault and poetic realist writer Jacques Prévert, The King and the Mockingbird is based on Hans Christian Andersen’s The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep, the tale of a cross-eyed king enamored of a painting of a shepherdess who only has eyes for a neighboring painting.
Brewster McCloud

Brewster McCloud

DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
1970 / 105min / 35mm
Reimagining the myth of Icarus, Altman risked imitating it—that is, letting his outsized imagination brush too close to the sun. The study of a boy (Bud Cort) living in the Houston Astrodome who aspires to fly away on a pair of self-constructed bird wings has been embraced as prime Altman and an authentic ‘70s one-off.
The Birds

The Birds

DIRECTOR: ALFRED HITCHCOCK
1963 / 119min / 35mm
One of Hitchcock’s supreme master-builder achievements plays on our fear of nature’s capricious cruelty, with San Francisco transplants Tippi Hedren and Rod Taylor thrown together to try to survive the avian onslaught.
E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial

E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial

DIRECTOR: STEVEN SPIELBERG
1982 / 115min / 35mm
This Thanksgiving, Metrograph revisits this classic story of the friendship that blossoms between a kid named Elliott and an alien whose ship crash-lands in the woods.
The Band Wagon

The Band Wagon

DIRECTOR: VINCENTE MINNELLI
1953 / 112min / 35mm
A self-reflexive backstage musical masterwork stars Fred Astaire as Tony Hunter, an aging, out-of-fashion song-and-dance star with a marked biographical resemblance to Fred Astaire.
Monkey Business

Monkey Business

DIRECTOR: HOWARD HAWKS
1952 / 97min / DCP
Cary Grant is a chemist whose staid married life turns upside down when he stumbles into a fountain-of-youth elixir in this simian screwball from director Hawks, who was always tickled by bringing man’s animal instinct out to play—Grant’s sidekick lab chimp is the most civilized critter in the film.
Fly Away Home

Fly Away Home

DIRECTOR: CARROLL BALLARD
1996 / 107min / 35mm
Daughter brings home a host of motherless hatchling geese, eccentric inventor dad decides to teach them how to fly their migratory routes by use of an ultralight aircraft, eventually joined in the air by his daughter en route to a bird sanctuary in North Carolina.
The Invisible Man

The Invisible Man

DIRECTOR: JAMES WHALE
1933 / 71min / 35mm
A scientist discovers the formula for a serum that makes him invisible, and quickly becomes drunk on the power of scot-free anonymity.
The Phantom Tollbooth

The Phantom Tollbooth

DIRECTOR: CHUCK JONES, ABE LEVITOW, AND DAVID MONAHAN
1970 / 90min / 35mm
Legendary animator Chuck Jones adapts Norman Juster’s beloved children’s book about Milo who strolls the San Francisco streets and pops into the titular tollbooth, emerging in a mind-bending animated alternate universe that operates by its own surreal set of rules.