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Films Showing

May 19

The Boy with the Green Hair

The Boy with the Green Hair

11:00am
DIRECTOR: JOSEPH LOSEY
1948 / 82min / 35mm
This parable looks at public reaction when the hair of an American war orphan mysteriously turns green.
Pasolini

Pasolini

12:45pm2:30pm
DIRECTOR: ABEL FERRARA
2014 / 84min / DCP
The Roman life and the imaginary worlds of Pier Paolo Pasolini intermingle in Ferrara’s retelling of the final days in the life of the fifty-year-old filmmaker and writer, in a lovely, haunting film that draws on his last interview and envisages scenes from an unmade final film and his incomplete novel, Petrolio.
Gold Diggers of 1937

Gold Diggers of 1937

DIRECTOR: LLOYD BACON
1936 / 101min / 35mm
When two investors inform an opportunistic dancer that they can't fund an elderly stage producer's production, she suggests they get an insurance policy on the producer's life.
Orpheus

Orpheus

DIRECTOR: JEAN COCTEAU
1950 / 95min / 35mm
Jean Cocteau’s update of the Orpheus myth depicts a famous poet, scorned by the Left Bank youth, and his love for both his wife, Eurydice, and a mysterious princess. Seeking inspiration, the poet follows the princess from the world of the living to the land of the dead, through Cocteau’s famous mirrored portal.
Decade of Fire

Decade of Fire

11:00am8:30pm
DIRECTOR: GRETCHEN HILDEBRAN AND VIVIAN VáZQUEZ IRIZARRY
2018 / 76min / DCP
We all know the official story of South Bronx blight in the 1970s, but borough native Vazquez’s vital documentary tells another side of the tale, uncovering city government policies of methodical negligence.
Touch of Evil: Director's Cut

Touch of Evil: Director's Cut

DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES
1958/1998 / 111min / 35mm
While passing through the seedy border town of Los Robles, newlyweds Mike and Susan Vargas witness a car bomb explosion in which Rudy Linnekar, a local construction magnate, and his female companion are killed.
Asako I & II

Asako I & II

1:00pm3:30pm6:00pm10:30pm
DIRECTOR: RYûSUKE HAMAGUCHI
2018 / 119min / DCP
Following up Happy Hour, his justly acclaimed epic of everyday life, Hamaguchi offers a different but no less quietly revolutionary vision with this pop romance that moves from youthful exuberance and delusion to mature circumspection and compromise, while keeping up throughout a magical tonal balance of wistfulness, comic buoyancy, and the ineffably heartbreaking.
Long Day's Journey into Night

Long Day's Journey into Night

DIRECTOR: BI GAN
2018 / 140min / 3D DCP
Beginning as a kind of atmospheric, neon-drenched film noir fever dream, Long Day’s Journey Into Night follows Huang Jue as he returns to his hometown of Kaili for his father’s funeral, then sets off on the trail of an old flame.

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Decade of Fire

Decade of Fire

DIRECTOR: GRETCHEN HILDEBRAN AND VIVIAN VáZQUEZ IRIZARRY
2018 / 76min / DCP
We all know the official story of South Bronx blight in the 1970s, but borough native Vazquez’s vital documentary tells another side of the tale, uncovering city government policies of methodical negligence.
The Boy with the Green Hair

The Boy with the Green Hair

DIRECTOR: JOSEPH LOSEY
1948 / 82min / 35mm
This parable looks at public reaction when the hair of an American war orphan mysteriously turns green.
Pasolini

Pasolini

12:45pm2:30pm
DIRECTOR: ABEL FERRARA
2014 / 84min / DCP
The Roman life and the imaginary worlds of Pier Paolo Pasolini intermingle in Ferrara’s retelling of the final days in the life of the fifty-year-old filmmaker and writer, in a lovely, haunting film that draws on his last interview and envisages scenes from an unmade final film and his incomplete novel, Petrolio.
Asako I & II

Asako I & II

DIRECTOR: RYûSUKE HAMAGUCHI
2018 / 119min / DCP
Following up Happy Hour, his justly acclaimed epic of everyday life, Hamaguchi offers a different but no less quietly revolutionary vision with this pop romance that moves from youthful exuberance and delusion to mature circumspection and compromise, while keeping up throughout a magical tonal balance of wistfulness, comic buoyancy, and the ineffably heartbreaking.
Gold Diggers of 1937

Gold Diggers of 1937

DIRECTOR: LLOYD BACON
1936 / 101min / 35mm
When two investors inform an opportunistic dancer that they can't fund an elderly stage producer's production, she suggests they get an insurance policy on the producer's life.
Orpheus

Orpheus

DIRECTOR: JEAN COCTEAU
1950 / 95min / 35mm
Jean Cocteau’s update of the Orpheus myth depicts a famous poet, scorned by the Left Bank youth, and his love for both his wife, Eurydice, and a mysterious princess. Seeking inspiration, the poet follows the princess from the world of the living to the land of the dead, through Cocteau’s famous mirrored portal.
Touch of Evil: Director's Cut

Touch of Evil: Director's Cut

DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES
1958/1998 / 111min / 35mm
While passing through the seedy border town of Los Robles, newlyweds Mike and Susan Vargas witness a car bomb explosion in which Rudy Linnekar, a local construction magnate, and his female companion are killed.
Long Day's Journey into Night

Long Day's Journey into Night

DIRECTOR: BI GAN
2018 / 140min / 3D DCP
Beginning as a kind of atmospheric, neon-drenched film noir fever dream, Long Day’s Journey Into Night follows Huang Jue as he returns to his hometown of Kaili for his father’s funeral, then sets off on the trail of an old flame.
PRIVATE EVENT TODAY IN THEATER & COMMISSARY

PRIVATE EVENT TODAY IN THEATER & COMMISSARY

- / 360min / 35mm
We'll see you tomorrow!
Hyenas

Hyenas

DIRECTOR: DJIBRIL DIOP MAMBÉTY
1992 / 110min / DCP
Hyenas is a hallucinatory comic adaptation of Swiss avant-garde writer Friedrich Dürrenmatt’s play The Visit, which in Mambéty’s imagining follows a now-rich woman returning to her poor desert hometown to propose a deal to the populace: Her fortune, in exchange for the death of the man who years earlier abandoned her and left her with his child.
Il Grido

Il Grido

DIRECTOR: MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI
1957 / 116min / 35mm
Antonioni’s last film before the watershed of L’Avventura, Il Grido finds the filmmaker’s mature style fully in place, but is something of an outlier when compared to the examinations of estrangement and anomie ahead in its focus on the working-class—rather than bourgeois—experience.
Diamantino

Diamantino

DIRECTOR: GABRIEL ABRANTES & DANIEL SCHMIDT
2018 / 96min / DCP
Alone or in collaboration with one another or other like-minded collaborators, over the last several years directors Gabriel Abrantes and Daniel Schmidt have created some of the most hysterically deranged short films out there, and their feature debut doesn’t disappoint in its heady blend of political satire and gender-bending sexual anarchy.
Winged Migration

Winged Migration

DIRECTOR: JACQUES PERRIN WITH JACQUES CLUZAUD AND MICHEL DEBATS
2001 / 89min / 35mm
Shooting from helicopters, airplanes, gliders, and balloons, filmmakers Perrin, Cluzard, and Debats exploit cinema’s gravity-defying capabilities in the nature documentary that became a cultural sensation, a film that soars along with migratory birds on all seven continents as they embark on their annual journeys.
The Arrangement

The Arrangement

DIRECTOR: ELIA KAZAN
1969 / 125min / 35mm
In Kazan’s complaint, Kirk Douglas’ compulsively adulterous ad exec mounts his own rebellion against a values system that has made him affluent but empty. Is this a frantic, truculent indulgence? A film maudit of monumental proportions? Kazan’s own Skidoo? You have to see this rarely-screened curio to find out.
Pickup on South Street

Pickup on South Street

DIRECTOR: SAMUEL FULLER
1953 / 80min / DCP
"And I chose Pickup on South Street because Thelma Ritter is my favorite actress and this was certainly her greatest role—when I met Sam Fuller I thanked him for giving her such great dialogue and he said, ‘She was the only actress I could think of who could explain her predicament with just the look in her eyes.’”—Barry Gifford
The Strange One

The Strange One

DIRECTOR: JACK GARFEIN
1957 / 100min / 35mm
“I chose The Strange One because Ben Gazzara’s Jocko DeParis is as mean and sadistic as my platoon leader was when I was in the Air Force Reserve at the University of Missouri in 1964. Years later, when I heard that he’d been shot down flying a mission in Vietnam, I was not displeased—not that I was necessarily rooting for the Viet Cong, but I couldn’t help but feel they’d done the world a favor by taking him out of the count."—Barry Gifford
Orlando

Orlando

DIRECTOR: SALLY POTTER
1992 / 94min / 35mm
Potter’s utterly sui generis gender-bender period piece features Tilda Swinton as an immortal nobleman who inherits his parents’ house back in 1600 from a dying Queen Elizabeth I. Inspired by Virginia Woolf’s 1928 novel but, rather than following it to the letter, boldly taking liberties with the text, a cinematic equivalent of Woolf’s own searching literary inventions.
The Garden

The Garden

DIRECTOR: DEREK JARMAN
1990 / 88min / DCP
Half waking dream and half fiery polemic, The Garden was born of director Jarman’s rage over continued anti-gay discrimination and the sluggardly response to the AIDS crisis.
Monsieur Hulot's Holiday

Monsieur Hulot's Holiday

DIRECTOR: JACQUES TATI
1953 / 83min / DCP
Tati’s pipe-smoking, tan trench coat-clad alter-ego heads out to a seaside resort for a little rest and relaxation—but there’s never much of either on offer when the accident-prone Hulot is around.
Creature from the Black Lagoon

Creature from the Black Lagoon

DIRECTOR: JACK ARNOLD
1954 / 79min / 3D DCP
Before The Shape of Water, there was the Creature—the so-called “Gill-man,” the amphibious terror of the Amazon that was the last of the great Universal monsters, designed by Disney animator Milicent Patrick, realized by make-up artist Bud Westmore, and portrayed underwater by stuntwoman Ginger Stanley.
The Raft

The Raft

DIRECTOR: MARCUS LINDEEN
2018 / 97min / DCP
In the summer of 1973, an international crew of six women and five men, chosen for their youth, diversity, and sex appeal, embarked together on a most unusual sea voyage—a close-quarters, privacy-free trip across the Atlantic on a raft christened the Acali.
An American Tail

An American Tail

DIRECTOR: DON BLUTH
1986 / 80min / 35mm
“There are No Cats in America”—or so believe the family of rodent Fievel Mousekewitz, who is separated from his folks somewhere between Imperial Russia and their new home in the U.S., where the streets aren’t exactly lined with cheese.
Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation

Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation

DIRECTOR: HENRY KOSTER
1962 / 116min / 35mm
Jimmy Stewart, reteaming with his Harvey director Koster, gives us the American family man’s version of Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday, with Stewart’s stressed-out banker Hobbs trying to survive his vacation in one piece, dealing alongside wife Maureen O’Hara with a run-down beach house crammed to bursting with in-laws, grandkids, and other perils.
The Golem with Live Performance by Gary Lucas

The Golem with Live Performance by Gary Lucas

DIRECTOR: CARL BOESE & PAUL WEGENER
1920 / 76min / DCP
A forerunner to Frankenstein among other canonical horror films, this silent stunner based on a sixteenth century Jewish myth stars co-director Wegener in the title role, a monster shaped out of clay by a rabbi and sent to the Hapsburg emperor to discourage further persecution of his Jewish citizenry.
A Bigger Splash

A Bigger Splash

DIRECTOR: JACK HAZAN
1974 / 106min / DCP
Jack Hazan’s A Bigger Splash (1974) dispenses with drab talking-head portraiture to create an intimate and innovative film about English-born, London-schooled, California-based artist David Hockney and his work that honors its subject through creative risk rather than slavish hagiography.
Pee Wee's Big Adventure

Pee Wee's Big Adventure

DIRECTOR: TIM BURTON
1985 / 91min / 35mm
The story of one man-child’s search for his red bicycle, Burton’s more-than-distinctive directorial debut is a rocky road trip studded with wild and weird 1950s-by-way-of-the-1980s Americana, including urban legend-ready truck drivers, rowdy biker gangs, and bigger-than-life tourist trap dinosaurs, all encountered en route to a last stand at the Alamo.
Chulas Fronteras + Del Mero Corazón

Chulas Fronteras + Del Mero Corazón

DIRECTOR: LES BLANK
1976 + 1979 / 87min / DCP
Two celebratory films by Les Blank, that most warm, convivial, and richly human of American documentarians, both exploring the wealth of Mexican-American culture by focusing on the famed Norteño and Conjunto musicians of the Mexico-Texas borderlands, the migrant farming communities from which they come, and the social protest ethos inscribed in their music.
The Kid

The Kid

DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
1921 / 68min / 35mm
Regarded as the Tramp’s first jump into feature films, this six-reeler shows Chaplin at his most brilliant and most sentimental, plumbing memories of his own boyhood of almost Dickensian deprivation. The Tramp adopts an abandoned boy, played by soon-to-be-child-superstar Jackie Coogan, and fights against remarkable odds to keep the lad at his side.