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Films Showing

July 22

Love Meetings

Love Meetings

5:30pm
DIRECTOR: PIER PAOLO PASOLINI
1964 / 92min / 35mm
For his second nonfiction outing, Pasolini took on the role of interlocutor, often appearing on camera himself to interview a wide range of his Italian countrymen from all walks of life, questioning them on their attitudes on topics including love, sex, homosexuality, divorce, and sex work.
Streetwise

Streetwise

7:30pm
DIRECTOR: MARTIN BELL
1984 / 91min / DCP
This tough, unsentimental, deeply empathetic documentary, shot in palpably gritty 16mm, could only be the result of extraordinary understanding between filmmakers and subjects, the ignored and despised children left behind by official eighties prosperity.
The Hawks and the Sparrows

The Hawks and the Sparrows

7:30pm
DIRECTOR: PIER PAOLO PASOLINI
1966 / 91min / 35mm
A populist by inclination, always enormously interested in the folk aspects of mass popular culture, Pasolini leapt at the chance to work with the wildly popular comic actor Totò, appearing opposite Pasolini favorite Ninetto Davoli as father and son in this comic time-travel fable, which sees the duo traveling back to the time of St. Francis.
La Rabbia

La Rabbia

9:30pm
DIRECTOR: PIER PAOLO PASOLINI
1963/2008 / 81min / 35mm
In 1963, producer Gastone Ferranti posed a provocative question to both Pasolini and the right-wing journalist Giovannino Guareschi: Why are our lives dominated by fear, and what causes this fear? Individually these two intellectual foils went on to propose their theories in the two halves of the Ferranti-produced La Rabbia (Anger).
Cassandro, the Exotico!

Cassandro, the Exotico!

9:30pm
DIRECTOR: MARIE LOSIER
2018 / 73min / DCP
Marie Losier puts the spotlight on a stupendous LGBTQ+ showman in Cassandro, the Exotico!. Known in the wrestling ring as Cassandro, 47-year-old Saul Armendariz is the openly gay champion of Mexico’s exotico wrestling circuit, a subgenre featuring competitors in drag and, between back-breaking suplexes, generous doses of camp vamping.

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Love Meetings

Love Meetings

DIRECTOR: PIER PAOLO PASOLINI
1964 / 92min / 35mm
For his second nonfiction outing, Pasolini took on the role of interlocutor, often appearing on camera himself to interview a wide range of his Italian countrymen from all walks of life, questioning them on their attitudes on topics including love, sex, homosexuality, divorce, and sex work.
Streetwise

Streetwise

DIRECTOR: MARTIN BELL
1984 / 91min / DCP
This tough, unsentimental, deeply empathetic documentary, shot in palpably gritty 16mm, could only be the result of extraordinary understanding between filmmakers and subjects, the ignored and despised children left behind by official eighties prosperity.
The Hawks and the Sparrows

The Hawks and the Sparrows

DIRECTOR: PIER PAOLO PASOLINI
1966 / 91min / 35mm
A populist by inclination, always enormously interested in the folk aspects of mass popular culture, Pasolini leapt at the chance to work with the wildly popular comic actor Totò, appearing opposite Pasolini favorite Ninetto Davoli as father and son in this comic time-travel fable, which sees the duo traveling back to the time of St. Francis.
La Rabbia

La Rabbia

DIRECTOR: PIER PAOLO PASOLINI
1963/2008 / 81min / 35mm
In 1963, producer Gastone Ferranti posed a provocative question to both Pasolini and the right-wing journalist Giovannino Guareschi: Why are our lives dominated by fear, and what causes this fear? Individually these two intellectual foils went on to propose their theories in the two halves of the Ferranti-produced La Rabbia (Anger).
Cassandro, the Exotico!

Cassandro, the Exotico!

DIRECTOR: MARIE LOSIER
2018 / 73min / DCP
Marie Losier puts the spotlight on a stupendous LGBTQ+ showman in Cassandro, the Exotico!. Known in the wrestling ring as Cassandro, 47-year-old Saul Armendariz is the openly gay champion of Mexico’s exotico wrestling circuit, a subgenre featuring competitors in drag and, between back-breaking suplexes, generous doses of camp vamping.
TINY: The Life of Erin Blackwell

TINY: The Life of Erin Blackwell

DIRECTOR: MARTIN BELL
2016 / 87min / DCP
More than thirty years after Streetwise, Bell and his filmmaking partner, the late, legendary photographer Mary Ellen Mark, return to one of that film’s most haunting subjects, the brash 14-year-old who went by “Tiny.”
Mamma Roma

Mamma Roma

DIRECTOR: PIER PAOLO PASOLINI
1962 / 110min / 35mm
Anna Magnani, famed for her seemingly spontaneous, volcanic displays of emotion on screen, has perhaps her supreme role as the middle-aged sex worker nicknamed “Mamma Roma,” a footsore veteran of the street who lives only to imagine a better life for her teenage son who, newly arrived in town from the country, begins to slip inextricably towards delinquency.
Long Day's Journey into Night

Long Day's Journey into Night

DIRECTOR: BI GAN
2018 / 140min / 3D DCP
Beginning as a kind of atmospheric, neon-drenched film noir fever dream, Long Day’s Journey Into Night follows Huang Jue as he returns to his hometown of Kaili for his father’s funeral, then sets off on the trail of an old flame.
Ugetsu

Ugetsu

DIRECTOR: KENJI MIZOGUCHI
1953 / 96min / 35mm
Kyō is quite literally out of this world—that is, belonging to the realm of the spirits—in Mizoguchi’s adaptation of the 18th century ghost stories of Ueda Akinari. In war-torn feudal Japan, a potter defies his wife’s wishes and takes his wares to market, in so doing bringing grief upon them both, and leading him to take shelter finally with Kyō’s noble Lady Wakasa, who isn’t exactly what she seems.
A Bigger Splash

A Bigger Splash

DIRECTOR: JACK HAZAN
1974 / 106min / DCP
Jack Hazan’s A Bigger Splash (1974) dispenses with drab talking-head portraiture to create an intimate and innovative film about English-born, London-schooled, California-based artist David Hockney and his work that honors its subject through creative risk rather than slavish hagiography.
Chalk

Chalk

DIRECTOR: ROB NILSSON
1996 / 144min / DCP
Directed by Rob Nilsson, Chalk centers its drama around a rundown black pool hall operated by the dying 60-year-old Watson (Edwin Johnson). The rough-and-ready film was brilliantly shot on video by DP Mickey Freeman and produced by Rand Crook and Ethan Sing.
Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!

Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!

DIRECTOR: PEDRO ALMODóVAR
1989 / 101min / DCP
Stockholm syndrome has never been steamier than it in Almodóvar’s sickly sweet torture chamber drama, in which young Antonio Banderas, fresh from the psych hospital, makes Victoria Abril, the soft-core porn star of his dreams, a hostage in her own home, their forced cohabitation gradually developing into a bondage-strapped parody of courtship and domesticity.
Shane

Shane

DIRECTOR: GEORGE STEVENS
1953 / 118min / 35mm
Enigmatic gunslinger Shane rides into a small Wyoming town with the hopes of quietly settling down as a farmhand. Taking a job on homesteader Joe Starrett's farm, Shane is drawn into a conflict between the townsfolk and ruthless cattle baron Rufus Ryker.
Accattone

Accattone

DIRECTOR: PIER PAOLO PASOLINI
1961 / 117min / 35mm
Pasolini’s debut shocked Italian society not merely in its subject matter—the depiction of a small-time Roman pimp, going about his rounds and dealing with threats to his business—but for its manner of execution, something very distinct from the neorealist tradition to date.
Older Brother, Younger Sister

Older Brother, Younger Sister

DIRECTOR: MIKIO NARUSE
1953 / 86min / 35mm
When Mon (Kyō) returns to her home village from Tokyo pregnant and unmarried, the resulting scandal threatens the marriage prospects of her bookish little sister and the survival of her already down-on-their-luck family, prompting her brooding brother to drive her back to the city and a life of sex work.
Share

Share

DIRECTOR: PIPPA BIANCO
2019 / 87min / DCP
After a night of partying, high-school sophomore Mandy discovers that a series of cell-phone videos of her—half-dressed and semiconscious—have gone viral. Struggling to piece together what happened, Mandy has to navigate a landscape littered with others’ good intentions and find a way to heal from a wound she can’t identify.
Rashomon

Rashomon

DIRECTOR: AKIRA KUROSAWA
1950 / 89min / 35mm
A riveting psychological thriller that investigates the nature of truth and the meaning of justice, Rashomon is widely considered one of the key texts of Japanese—and world—cinema. Four people give different accounts of a man’s murder and the rape of his wife, which director Akira Kurosawa presents with striking imagery and an ingenious use of flashbacks.
Ashes and Diamonds

Ashes and Diamonds

DIRECTOR: ANDREJ WAJDA
1958 / 103min / DCP
Andrej Wajda’s searing 1958 masterpiece about a young Polish Nationalist Army assassin, tasked in the last days of World War 2 to kill a communist official. Please join Walter Bernstein for this special screening in honor of his hundredth birthday.
Street of Shame

Street of Shame

DIRECTOR: KENJI MIZOGUCHI
1956 / 85min / 35mm
Though best known for his period works, Mizoguchi’s final film was almost brutally contemporary, set in a cathouse in Tokyo’s red light district before the Japanese National Diet outlawed prostitution in Japan. We are privileged to see not only business as usual at the aptly-named Dreamland, but the inner yearnings of the women, who hope against hope for a better tomorrow.
The Face of Another

The Face of Another

DIRECTOR: HIROSHI TESHIGAHARA
1966 / 124min / 35mm
The great Tatsuya Nakadai plays Mr. Okuyama, a businessman disfigured beyond recognition in a freak industrial accident who, through the operations of his psychiatrist, is affixed with a lifelike mask molded from the features of a stranger, a miracle solution that in time becomes a curse, eroding Okuyama’s sense of self and resulting in a disturbing change in his personality.
Old Boyfriends

Old Boyfriends

DIRECTOR: JOAN TEWKESBURY
1979 / 103min / 35mm
The directorial debut of Joan Tewkesbury, Old Boyfriends follows Talia Shire’s clinical psychologist through a process of emotional bottoming-out and stock-taking, deciding after a breakdown to reconnect with exes.
The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms

The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms

DIRECTOR: EUGèNE LOURIé
1953 / 80min / 35mm
A ferocious dinosaur awakened by an Arctic atomic test terrorizes the North Atlantic and, ultimately, New York City.
Jokyo

Jokyo

DIRECTOR: KON ICHIKAWA, YASUZô MASAMURA, AND KôZABURô YOSHIMURA
1960 / 100min / 35mm
In this omnibus film bringing together three stories about women by Yoshimura, Ichikawa, and Masumura, Kyō stars in Yoshimura’s “The Woman Who Forgot Love” as a cruel bar owner who ignores both her sister-in-law’s financial hardships and an injured schoolboy’s needs.
Notes towards an African Orestes

Notes towards an African Orestes

DIRECTOR: PIER PAOLO PASOLINI
1970 / 65min / 35mm
Pasolini’s thrillingly freeform documentary, narrated in the style of thoughts dashed off in a notebook, charts his ambitions to make a film of the Greek tragedy of Orestes in Tanzania, Ethiopia, and Uganda; in looking to Euripedes’s classic cycle of plays, the director saw metaphorical parallels to African nations that were emerging into independence in the sixties.
La Ricotta + 3 By Godard

La Ricotta + 3 By Godard

DIRECTOR: PIER PAOLO PASOLINI AND JEAN-LUC GODARD
1961 / 1963 / 74min / 35mm
Pasolini's short film from Ro.Go.Pa.G, "La Ricotta," screens with two Godard shorts from the 1960s, "La Paresse" ("Sloth") from The Seven Deadly Sins and "Le Grand Escroq" ("The Great Swindle") from The World's Greatest Swindles.
Georgia, Georgia

Georgia, Georgia

DIRECTOR: STIG BJöRKMAN
1972 / 91min / 35mm
Georgia, Georgia (1972), shot on location in Sweden, is an early work from the director, author, and film critic Stig Björkman, with a screenplay by Maya Angelou. Diana Sands portrays an unraveling singer abroad, lonely in love and sick of imposed racial obligations.
Floating Weeds

Floating Weeds

DIRECTOR: YASUJIRO OZU
1959 / 119min / DCP
Ozu’s remake of his own 1934 silent A Story of Floating Weeds adds color, the eye of the brilliant Rashomon and Ugetsu cinematographer Kazuo Miyagawa, and of course Kyō, playing the mistress of the head of a kabuki theatre troupe who’s embittered to learn that her lover has begun to visit his former paramour, now running a small restaurant in the town on the edge of the Inland Sea where they’re slated to perform.
Like Water for Chocolate

Like Water for Chocolate

DIRECTOR: ALFONSO ARAU
1992 / 105min / DCP
Based on a novel by Laura Esquivel, Alfonso Arau’s seductive, delicious, and enormously charming film is a work of hot-and-heavy magical realism set in a Mexican town circa 1910, where young lovers Tita and Pedro have been forbidden to marry, leading to smoldering unfulfilled desire and inexplicable goings-on in Tita’s kitchen.
Vision Portraits

Vision Portraits

DIRECTOR: RODNEY EVANS
2019 / 78min / DCP
Extensive eyesight loss and the possibility of total blindness didn’t shut down filmmaker Rodney Evans (Brother to Brother, 2004). Instead, it inspired this profoundly personal non-fiction film, which not only documents Evan’s own genetic eye disorder, but shows how three other working artists with visual impairments—photographer John Dugdale, writer Ryan Knighton, and dancer Kayla Hamilton—have adjusted their practices around their changed capacities.
Honey, I Shrunk the Kids

Honey, I Shrunk the Kids

DIRECTOR: JOE JOHNSTON
1989 / 93min / DCP
When, unbeknownst to absent-minded professor Nick Szalinski, his latest invention of reduces his children and those of his neighbors to insectoid size, the kids have to embark on an epic journey across a backyard grown to Amazonian proportions, an adventure distinguished by a parade of ingenious practical effects illustrating the menaces posed by lawn sprinklers, mowers, and mud puddles.
Gate of Hell

Gate of Hell

DIRECTOR: TEINOSUKE KINUGASA
1953 / 89min / 35mm
The first color film from the Daiei studio, made with imported Eastmancolor stock, this Heiji Rebellion-era Cannes winner concerns the samurai Morito (Kazuo Hasegawa) and his all-consuming desire for married lady-in-waiting Kesa (Kyō), whose husband the warrior plots to do away with.
They Live By Night

They Live By Night

DIRECTOR: NICHOLAS RAY
1948 / 95min / 35mm
Nicolas Ray’s first film is perhaps his most far-reaching. Visually, it shows Ray’s impressionistic approach to filmmaking early in his career. I think there is a certain freedom to this movie, which most likely wouldn’t have lived up to the confines of Hollywood expectations. Ironically, Ray was eventually one of the most successful filmmakers in Hollywood.
Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner

Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner

DIRECTOR: TONY RICHARDSON
1962 / 104min / 35mm
Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner depicts a young petty thief who doesn’t have much of anything, really. He’s an angry, disgruntled young man who gets caught robbing a bakery. After he’s sent to a juvenile detention center, running becomes not only his way of transcending the hardships of his life, but also his way of ultimately defying them.
Odd Obsession

Odd Obsession

DIRECTOR: KON ICHIKAWA
1959 / 107min / 35mm
Ichikawa’s perverse, drily comic drama of public prestige and private prurience based on novelist Junichirō Tanizaki’s The Key stars Kyō as the young wife of a middle-aged man who, as he is consumed by the suspicion that his spouse is interested in his daughter’s dashing fiancé, discovers that jealousy is a powerful aphrodisiac, renewing his flagging desire in a manner which medical injections have thus failed to do.
The Trip + The Spook Who Sat By the Door

The Trip + The Spook Who Sat By the Door

DIRECTOR: IVAN DIXON
1973 / 119min / 35mm
I’m a huge fan of Frank Wilderson’s Red, Black & White. In it I read about Ivan Dixon’s The Spook Who Sat By The Door. I’ve been dying to see Dixon's film since I read about it. I’m pairing it with The Trip because I can and because I crave the experience of seeing a film with an audience that probably hungers for its news today at least as much as I do.
The Harder They Come

The Harder They Come

DIRECTOR: PERRY HENZELL
1977 / 120min / DCP
Star Jimmy Cliff holds down both the screen and the soundtrack in this rude-boy cult classic, Jamaica’s first feature film, which draws on the legend of folk hero prison escapee Ivanhoe “Rhygin” Martin. Cliff plays Ivan, a bumpkin naif freshly arrived in Kingston with dreams of making it as a singer who soon enough acquires a new skintight wardrobe, the nickname “Pretty Boy,” and a hit single—though none of the profits, thanks to a corrupt record exec.