Phantom Thread

Director: Paul Thomas Anderson
USA / 2017 / 130 min

Followed by discussion between Vicky Krieps and critic Adam Nayman, author of the new book Paul Thomas Anderson: Masterworks.

“I think he is the most demanding man,” observes Alma (Vicky Krieps) of her new lover Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis) early in Phantom Thread, a description that turns out to be piercingly double-edged: the trick of Paul Thomas Anderson’s sublime romantic fable is how it simultaneously romanticizes and deconstructs the myth of rigorous, exacting male genius through the perspective of a woman held fully and yet impatiently in its thrall. While only a few years old, the film, focusing on a battle of wills between dressmaker Woodcock, his sister Cyril (Lesley Manville), and his muse Alma, has already taken on the burnished glow of a classic.

In his new book Paul Thomas Anderson: Masterworks (published October 20 via Abrams), critic Adam Nayman (Cinema Scope, The Ringer) examines Phantom Thread’s luxurious, intricate weave of contradictions as part of a critical study of its subject’s overall body of work. In addition to all-new essays on each of Anderson’s films (all accompanied by newly commissioned artwork from the team at Little White Lies), the book features detailed interviews with a number of PTA’s key collaborators, including Krieps.